Month: July 2018

The mantle beneath Tibet has been torn into four massive pieces, according to a new computer model that gives an unprecedented glimpse at what’s going on under the surface our planet. Determining exactly what’s happening so far underground isn’t always easy, but can help in everything from predicting earthquakes to understanding how terrain evolves over
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Who are we? How did life emerge? And are we alone? These questions are bandied about so often that they almost cause one’s eyes to glaze over. But in his latest book “Astrobiology, Discovery and Societal Impact,” astronomer and historian of science Steven Dick asks a few that are rarely addressed in the mainstream science
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Theoretical research by an international team of physicists has discovered that the Great Pyramid of Giza can concentrate electromagnetic energy in its internal chambers and under its base. And although the ancient Egyptian’s probably weren’t aware of this weird design quirk, the study could be important for nanoparticle research in the future. “Applications of modern
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The world’s largest king penguin colony has dramatically collapsed, and as yet scientists just don’t know why. From 2 million members in the 1980s, including 500,000 breeding pairs, the population on the sub-Antarctic Île aux Cochons has shrunk to just 60,000 breeding pairs. Using recent high-resolution satellite data from 2005 onwards, and helicopter and satellite
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“The probability that ‘In My Life’ was written by McCartney is .018.” “Which basically means it’s pretty convincingly a Lennon song.” And with that, Harvard researcher and passionate Beatles fan Mark Glickman made his telling contribution to one of the eternal pop music pub arguments – who wrote the Beatles’ best tracks? The difference this
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It only happens once every 11 years, but occasionally, all five naked-eye planets are visible at once. Mercury is always the toughest to spot due to its proximity to the Sun, but sometimes Mars or even Venus can appear smaller.Martin Dolan From humanity’s perspective, the Sun and Moon always dominate Earth’s skies. The Moon and Sun are both
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The headlines in recent months read like an international eco-thriller. At Mauna Loa Observatory, perched high on a Hawaiian volcano, researchers measure unusual levels of CFC-11 in the atmosphere. The measurements baffle the scientific community: CFC-11, a potent ozone-depleting gas, has been carefully monitored since it was banned under the 1987 Montreal Protocol. But the
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16 different species of Phaeodaria (http://caliban.mpiz-koeln.mpg.de/haeckel/kunstformen/high/Tafel_061_schema_300.html).Public Domain / Kunstformen der Natur, Ernst Haeckel (1904) Little light permeates 100 meters below sea level where the ocean’s twilight zone begins. Although this section of the ocean is relatively food-depleted, the twilight zone is teeming with sea life that subsists on gradually sinking bits of organic matter, including waste products and decomposing critters. This “marine
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The Carr Fire tearing through Northern California is so powerful that it’s creating its own weather patterns. The explosive blaze reached the city of Redding on Thursday night. By Saturday morning, the fire grew to 80,906 acres and is only around 5 percent contained, according to officials. The fire has destroyed 500 structures, and officials say 5,000 more are threatened. Around
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On March 8, 2014, Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 vanished from air traffic control radar screens, never to be seen again – and in the process spawned the most incredible aviation mystery of the 21st century. The 239 people on board were never found, and are presumed dead. Investigations dedicated to finding the plane, the victims,
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Use a little imagination, and you see the new rover’s “face.”Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech Now under construction—NASA’s newest rover. Still without a name, the souped-up successor to Curiosity won’t launch for two years. But already, engineers are “bolting together the bits and pieces of hardware,” says Ken Farley of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena,
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Wildfires in northern California blanket parts of the West with thick smoke on July 28, 2018.NOAA/NASA The immense size and intensity of wildfires can level entire communities and consume hundreds of square miles of land. Wildfires can grow so large that they actually alter the atmosphere around them. We’ve seen several recent examples of devastating
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Caribbean lizards that survived the tough 2017 hurricane season have larger toe pads, on both front and back limbs, report researchers. The work is first to demonstrate the effects of hurricane-induced natural selection. The hyperactive 2017 season was one of the worst that the Atlantic Ocean region ever experienced. Hurricane Harvey hit in mid-August 2017,
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The Chinese shipbuilder that’s constructing Beijing’s third aircraft carrier, Type 002, leaked an artist’s impression of that carrier on social media in late June that heightened intrigue about China’s naval ambitions before quickly taking it down. The China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation photo showed the future Type 002 with a large flight deck that featured an
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Do North American landbirds molt on their breeding territories before migrating or do they have discrete locations where they go to molt? The answer is surprising a lot of people This adult male northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) has a less-than-spectacular appearance because he is molting. This study suggests that northern cardinals, which are resident, still
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Shutterstock Accidentally biting your gum is painful, but the upside is that it will usually heal quite quickly; much faster, in fact, than a wound of similar size on your skin. That’s quite odd, when you think about it. After all, between eating, talking, yawning and making all manner of facial expressions, our mouths are
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