Month: May 2018

Propelled by the perfect combination of xenon ions, hydrazine rocket propellant and adrenaline, Dawn is on the verge of its most ambitious exploits yet. Having flawlessly completed its latest assignment to study Ceres, the veteran explorer is now aiming for a new low. Earlier today Dawn ignited ion engine #2 to start maneuvering to its
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Every Christmas, sailors from Japan go out into the Southern Ocean, taking “biological sampling” that aims to investigate “the structure and dynamics of the Antarctic marine ecosystem”. But no, they aren’t trying to understand more about climate change, or investigating the mating songs of the ocean. They’re out killing hundreds of Antarctic minke whales, and then
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Anyone who thinks there’s no such thing as a stupid question, clearly hasn’t met an online troll before. This week, the US Geological Survey (USGS) was trying to keep the public informed about Hawaii’s ongoing volcanic eruption when suddenly, they were obliged to confirm that no, toasting marshmallows over a volcano is not really the
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Few geologic events capture the imagination like an erupting volcano. We thrill at the image: Hot, molten rock comes bursting out of the ground, destroying most everything in its path. Volcanoes can cause massive disasters that kill tens of thousands, and they can produce amazing sights like hypnotic lava fountains. With an eruption like the
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The hysteria about the future of artificial intelligence (AI) is everywhere. There seems to be no shortage of sensationalist news about how AI could cure diseases, accelerate human innovation and improve human creativity. Just looking at the media headlines, you might think that we are already living in a future where AI has infiltrated every
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On Tuesday, May 22nd at 12:47 p.m. PDT, SpaceX successfully launched five Iridium® NEXT satellites and two GRACE-FO satellites from Space Launch Complex 4E (SLC-4E) at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. Liftoff occurred at 12:47 p.m. PDT, or 19:47 UTC. The GRACE-FO satellites were deployed about eleven minutes and thirty seconds after launch, followed by
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On Friday, May 11th at 4:14 p.m. EDT, SpaceX successfully launched Bangabandhu Satellite-1 from historic Launch Complex 39A (LC-39A) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Following stage separation, Falcon 9’s first stage successfully landed on “Of Course I Still Love You,” SpaceX’s droneship stationed in the Atlantic Ocean. Falcon 9 delivered Bangabandhu Satellite-1 to
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Jessica Saggio FLORIDA TODAY Published 3:32 PM EDT May 9, 2018 Here on the Space Coast, we’re a bit spoiled.   Don’t act like it’s not true.  For real, where else is it commonplace to see a launch or live next to actual rocket scientist? Do not even say Texas or California because I will physically fight you.
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Welcome home, Dragon! Bringing back more than 4,000 pounds of NASA cargo, science and technology demonstration samples from the International Space Station, the Dragon spacecraft successfully returned to Earth, splashing down in the Pacific Ocean today at about 11:59 a.m. PDT. The spacecraft will be taken by ship to Long Beach, California where some cargo
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Photo: NASA The Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE or XTE) spacecraft re-entered the atmosphere on April 30, 2018 after over 22 years in orbit, sixteen of which were spent observing the time variation of astronomical X-ray sources – contributing to over 1,400 scientific papers and validating parts of Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity. RXTE measured
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Photo: CASC/Weibo The upper stage of a Long March 11 rocket re-entered the atmosphere on April 29, 2018 after only three days in orbit. Lifting a cluster of five commercial Earth-imaging satellites into a 500-Kilometer orbit, the CZ-11 fourth stage used leftover propellant for a partial de-orbit maneuver, lowering its perigee to 120 Kilometers to
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